Zumwalt Poems Online

joni song seagull

Working in coffee houses and folk clubs, first in Toronto and then in the states, Roberta Joan Anderson, or simply Joni Anderson, and then later Joni Mitchell (taking her new surname as a result of a brief marriage from 1965-1967 to a Michigan folk-singer) begin getting attention for her song writing skills as more established artists with recording contracts begin to cover her songs.  First there was folksinger Tom Rush recording  “Urge for Going”, after Rush presented it to Judy Collins, who was not interested, then country singer George Hamilton IV placing it on the country charts for 21 weeks with it peaking at the number seven spot.  Then Buffy Sainte-Marie  recorded “The Circle Game”) and Dave Van Ronk recorded “Both Sides Now”, followed by Judy Collins recording that same song and another on her 1967 Wildflowers album with “Both Sides Now” being a major hit, by far Collins’ biggest hit, peaking at 8 on the pop charts, and 3 on the adult contemporary charts.

Joni’s own chance at commercial recordings came with David Crosby hearing her in a club in Florida and then convincing Reprise records to record Mitchell as a folk-rock artist.  David took ownership of production, basically taking a more-or-less hands-off approach except for the well-intended mistake of having Joni sing into the open grand piano, forcing the removal of high frequencies in final production, resulting in a lower fidelity album.

With this very first Joni Mitchell album, we have a collection of songs all written by creating the music first and then adding the lyrics, and yet fitting them together in such a way so that neither is diluted. There are no major hits on this album, put there are a number of gems, the most sparkling is “Marcie”, which is representative of Joni Mitchell’s amazing ability to craft effective and meaningful words to align with her music. This is not the strongest or best selling of Joni’s many albums, but it is one no lover of music or lyrics should mistakenly ignore.  It is with this very album that Joni Mitchell begins the climb to her current legendary status, and becomes worthy of being mentioned in the same sentence of earlier 20th Century greats like Cole Porter, writing music with a recognizable identity and a level of merit that earnestly invites repeated attentive listenings.

joni-mitchell-song-to-a-seagull-ab (2)

Track listing [from Wikipedia]

All tracks written by Joni Mitchell.

Side One: I Came to the City

#

Title

Length

1

“I Had a King”

3:37

2.

“Michael from Mountains”

3:41

3.

“Night in the City”

2:30

4.

“Marcie”

4:35

5.

“Nathan La Franeer”

3:18

Side 2: Out of the City and Down to the Seaside

#

Title

Length

6.

“Sisotowbell Lane”

4:05

7.

“The Dawntreader”

5:04

8.

“The Pirate of Penance”

2:44

9.

“Song to a Seagull”

3:51

10.

“Cactus Tree”

4:35

Personnel

  • Joni Mitchell – guitar, piano, vocals, artwork for album cover
  • Stephen Stills – bass on “Night in the City”
Technical
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Comments on: "Fifty Year Friday: Joni Mitchell; Song to a Seagull" (4)

  1. This is one of my favourite albums of hers, and personally I really mike David Crosby’s production. In fact it’s one of the things that makes it one of my favourites. But then as they say there’s no accounting for taste. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  2. She can be heard doing “Woodstock” herself on _Shadows and Light_, the live one, much later (1979?). The music is totally different, words the same. I like both versions.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Loved Joni Mitchell

    Liked by 1 person

  4. I’m a huge fan. Listen to everything she’s recorded; you can’t go wrong. For some back story I would recommend reading “Will you take me as I am,” and “Girls Like Us.”

    Liked by 1 person

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