Zumwalt Poems Online

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The first generally-recognized rock “supergroup” was the blues-leaning Cream with Eric Clapton, Jack Bruce and Ginger Baker.  Prior to that, Eric Clapton, Jack Bruce, and Stevie Winwood had formed Powerhouse, originally to have included Ginger Baker, but with only an output of three songs, and with two lesser-known members, Powerhouse could hardly have been considered the first supergroup. When Cream formed, Eric Clapton was already considered an established guitarist, Jack Bruce had survived the Graham Bond Organisation and made a name for himself in Manfred Mann, and Ginger Baker had established his credentials as a skilled drummer in the Graham Bond Organisation before founding Cream in 1966.

The second rock supergroup was formed during the initial stages of the inevitable rise of country-rock and country-folk-rock by three talented and recently “released” artists: David Crosby, was given the boot by the Byrds, mainly due to Crosby’s vision of the direction the Byrds should take not aligning with Roger McGuinn’s and Chris Hillman’s views, Stephen Stills was now free with the break-up of the Buffalo Springfield, and Graham Nash was now seeking new opportunities — Nash, the effective leader of the Hollies, had grown dissatisfied with the Hollie’s aggressive touring schedule and was also no longer interested in having to navigate the gap between Nash’s more creative and musically adventurous aspirations and the other Hollies’ members tendency towards more traditionally pop-oriented music.

Story goes that at a party in July 1968, either at Mama Cass’s or Judy Collin’s home, Nash had asked Stills and Crosby to sing Stills’ “You Don’t Have To Cry” and at some point Nash joined in, harmonizing on the spot.  The three then realized that had something, and soon determined to form a group — but not a group that would continue without any of them — and so they determined the best way to equate the group with the founding members was to name that group after those founding members: “Crosby, Stills and Nash.”

The trio reached out to the management team of Elliot Roberts and David Geffen who signed them with Atlantic, which then had to basically work out a trade for Graham Nash, sending  Richie Furay and his new band Poco to Epic.  (Note that Poco fit nicely into the rising popularity of country rock, releasing their first album, Pickin’ Up the Pieces, on May 19, 1968, only ten days before the release of Crosby, Stills and Nash. I ran out of time last week to review, but for those that like country-rock, this is a very solid country-rock album.)

Recorded in February and March of 1969, and released on May 29, 1969, Crosby, Stills and Nash album became almost instantly popular, with “Marrakesh Express”, a song Nash originally intended for the Hollies, getting airplay on AM radios in the middle of July, eventually reaching number 28 spot, soon followed by Suite Judy Blue Eyes peaking at number 21.  FM radio stations embraced the entire album, playing a number of the other fine tracks.

Excellency is really the hallmark of this album. Even if someone is not a fan of folk-rock, the effervescent and transparent blend of vocals and acoustic guitar work has to resonate with even the most selective of listeners.  If somehow you missed growing up with this classic album, or have otherwise not heard it, seek it out, for it is one of the most enjoyable country-folk rock albums ever recorded, so much so that I include this as another valid entry in my list of non-progressive-rock progressive rock albums!

Track listing [From Wikipedia]

Side one

#

Title

Writer(s)

Lead vocals

Length

1.

Suite: Judy Blue Eyes Stephen Stills Stills

7:25

2.

Marrakesh Express Graham Nash Nash

2:39

3.

Guinnevere David Crosby Crosby with Nash

4:40

4.

“You Don’t Have to Cry” Stephen Stills Stills with Crosby & Nash

2:45

5.

“Pre-Road Downs” Graham Nash Nash

2:56

Side two

#

Title

Writer(s)

Lead vocals

Length

1.

Wooden Ships Crosby, Paul Kantner, Stills Crosby with Stills

5:29

2.

Lady of the Island Graham Nash Nash

2:39

3.

Helplessly Hoping Stephen Stills Stills with Crosby & Nash

2:41

4.

“Long Time Gone” David Crosby Crosby with Stills

4:17

5.

“49 Bye-Byes” Stephen Stills Stills

5:16

 

Personnel 

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Comments on: "Fifty Year Friday: Crosby, Stills and Nash" (5)

  1. Indeed a fine album.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I’m amazed we still have them all with us 50 years later.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Fabulous group 💜

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Anonymous said:

    I can hear “Guinnevere” in my head right now. The lyric is good, too, particularly the pentagrams on the wall. Gorgeous harmonies and the guitar chords are perfect.

    My favorite Stephen Stills song was one written for Yes to record for Time and a Word. It was titled “Everydays” and featured string orchestra in places. The lyric was about world weariness and the overall tone was rather dark. I love it though.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Timeless album.

    Liked by 1 person

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